Mar
18

Bar Code Reader

History

This is a low cost bar code reader made from a product which has a very long history. You can see it at this link.  The bar code reader named CueCat is built to be connected in a PS2 keyboard port (standard PC/AT Keyboard). The problem is the information encrypted. 

I decided to build a small interface which fits in the CueCat to convert, decode the information and send it via RS232. Each time you scan a product, the decoded code is sent serially and is stored in an EEPROM which could store up to 128 bar codes.  The idea is to read many bar codes away from the PC.  This information could be retrieved later when the bar code reader will be connected to your PC. Later, you could send some commands to communicate with the CueCat. For example, "G" will get all the codes currently stored in the EEPROM; "C" will clear the entire memory.
Features
 

  •     Very low cost
  •     128 bar codes memory
  •     RS232 interface

Pictures

Download

Schematic

Source Code




6 Comments to “Bar Code Reader”

  • Noli July 25, 2010 at 8:47 am

    can you give me idea about a good proposal electronic project?

  • admin July 25, 2010 at 10:13 pm

    Hmmm, Check what I had done and it’s may give you insperation

  • Alex November 28, 2011 at 6:12 pm

    Hello. Did u used an arduino board to program the cuecat? Or how did you programmed it? Thx

  • admin November 29, 2011 at 1:10 pm

    No, I use my own processor, check a litle bit more my article everything is there

  • Scott April 5, 2012 at 4:36 am

    I have both PS2 and USB versions of the CueCat. There is a method to disable the encryption so it can read raw bar codes. This was known as "Declawing" or " Neutering" your CueCat.

  • admin April 5, 2012 at 1:20 pm

    Yes there is a way to do that, but I don’t remember what pin you must short, google it

    Sylvain

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Please note

All my source codes were taken from my personal projects.

Everything is for your information only. The C/C++ codes have been written
with ICCAVR. You can find the header and source CRT files by downloading their compiler.

All is for your information and everything is AS IS without any warranty of any kind. No other files are available and I don't make any modification for any body.

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